Mimosa ophthalmocentra

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Mimosa ophthalmocentra.jpeg
Mimosa ophthalmocentra (Red Jurema ) Wikipedia.png Plant-icon.png

1,6% DMT in the inner rootbark [1]


Mimosa ophthalmocentra
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Mimosoideae
Genus: Mimosa
Species: M. ophthalmocentra
Binomial name
Mimosa ophthalmocentra
Mart. ex Benth., 1875[1]

Mimosa ophthalmocentra, Jurema-embira ("Red Jurema") is a tree in the Fabaceae family. It is native to Brazil.[1] It is shrub or small tree about 3 to 5 m tall.[2][3] Its blossoms come in long, narrow cylindrical spikes having yellowish white petals and a white stamen.[3] The blossoms are sometimes found to have a pink tinge.[4] The fruit is green, sometimes with red or purple, flat, about 8 cm long and about 1 cm wide.[4]

The trunk grows to about 20 cm in diameter.[2]

Its wood has a density of about 1.12 g/cm³[5] and it makes good firewood.[6]

Traditional use

Traditionally in northeast Brazil, for cases of cough and bronchitis, a water extract (decoction) of Mimosa ophthalmocentra is made into a drink.[7] A handful of bark in one liter of water is used by itself or in a syrup.[7] The solution is taken until the symptoms subside.[7][8]

References

  1. ^ a b "Mimosa ophthalmocentra information from NPGS/GRIN". www.ars-grin.gov. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  2. ^ a b "MORI 14225". mobot.mobot.org. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  3. ^ a b "SysTax - detailed information on Mimosa ophthalmocentra Mart.". www.biologie.uni-ulm.de. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  4. ^ a b "HERINGER 11963". mobot.mobot.org. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  5. ^ "Kew: Northeast Brazil Fuelwood Project - activities and progress". www.kew.org. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  6. ^ "Fuelwoods: Structure and Sustainability - Kew: Science Directory: Projects". www.kew.org. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  7. ^ a b c Maria de Fátima Agra, Patrícia França de Freitas, José Maria Barbosa-Filho (2007). "Synopsis of the plants known as medicinal and poisonous in Northeast of Brazil". Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy 17 (1): 114–140. 
  8. ^ "Translated version of http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:x390ybNrGkAJ:www.ppgecologia.biologia.ufrj.br/oecologia/index.php/oecologiabrasiliensis/article/view/147/113&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=6". translate.google.com. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 

External links



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